Numerical analysis of effect of temperature history and restraint degree on cracking behavior of early-age concrete

  • Jianda Xin State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research;Department of Structures and Materials, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
  • Guoxin Zhang State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research;Department of Structures and Materials, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
  • Yi Liu State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research;Department of Structures and Materials, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
  • Zhenhong Wang State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research;Department of Structures and Materials, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
  • Zhe Wu State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research;Department of Structures and Materials, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
Keywords: Cooling rate, Cracking, Early-age, Numerical analysis, Restraint degree

Abstract

This paper presents a numerical analysis of concrete restraint tests conducted on a temperature stress testing machine (TSTM). Two numerical methods, namely a 1-D method using Matlab software and 3-D method using Midas software, were adopted. Factors, such as cooling rate and restraint degree, were numerically analyzed and compared with experimental results. Results show that numerical analyses of concrete restrained stresses were comparable with those of TSTM tests. The cracking potential of concrete decreased with higher cooling rate at early age and this benefit became more considerable for concrete structures under higher restraint conditions. A simplified relationship between the restraint degree and the allowed temperature difference is developed. Furthermore, it is found that the anti-cracking capability of concrete under different restraint conditions can be overestimated up to 56% when ignoring creep effect on values of restraint degree.

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Published
2020-05-23
Section
Civil Engineering (2)